Literacy Students

How Illiteracy Can Ruin Your Child’s Life

Executive Summary about Literacy Students by Joel Turtel

Literacy For Students

Literacy For Students

Literacy, the ability to read well, is the foundation of children’s education.

If children can’t read well, every subject they try to learn will frustrate them. If they can’t read math, history, or science textbooks, if they stumble over the words, they will soon give up reading out of frustration. Kids learn to read in their most formative years, which is why reading can profoundly affect their self-esteem. When children learn to read, they also start learning how to think abstractly, because words convey ideas and relationships between ideas. How well they read therefore affects children’s feelings about their ability to learn. Often, poor readers will struggle just to graduate from high school. Life for illiterate adults can easily degenerate into misery, poverty, failure, and hopelessness. According to a 1992 study by the National Institute for Literacy, “43 % of Americans with the lowest literacy skills live in poverty and 70 % have no job or a part-time job. Only 5% of Americans with strong literacy skills live in poverty.”

By the 1850s, before we had compulsory, government-controlled public schools, child and adult literacy rates averaged over 90 percent, making illiteracy rates less than 10 percent. What is literacy like in our public schools today?

In 2002, the New York State Education Department’s annual report on the latest reading and math scores for public school students found:

• 90 percent of middle schools failed to meet New York State minimum standards for math and English exam scores.

• 65 percent of elementary schools flunked the minimum standards.

• 84 percent of high schools failed to meet the minimum state standards.

• More than half of New York City’s black and hispanic elementary school students failed the state’s English and math exams. About 30 percent of white and asian-american students failed to achieve the minimum English test scores.

In short,as shown by the New York State Education Department’s annual report and other studies, student illiteracy rates in many public schools range from 30 to 75 percent. This is an education horror story.

I argue in my book, “Public Schools, Public Menace” that our public school system is the primary cause of this tragic illiteracy, and one reason why these schools are a menace to our children.

After you see this movie, you might think twice about keeping your children in public schools.

Literacy Students

How Illiteracy Can Ruin Your Child’s Life >>You Must Know About Education Learning And Teaching

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