Ed chairman of the council’s plan to offer Pa grad test

Ed chairman of the council’s plan to offer Pa grad test

By. Mr. Teacher

Ed chairman of the council's plan to offer Pa grad test

Ed chairman of the council's plan to offer Pa grad test

Harrisburg, Pa. – New Generation in the high school graduation competency exam will be phased in starting next year under plans unveiled Thursday by the chairman of the Pennsylvania Board of Education, the latest country to try to navigate a new opposition political minefield requirements.

Proposal for Testing Keystone, crafted in consultation with the school board, teachers and legislators, “reflect the best thinking of education and advice from the General Assembly,” Joe Torsella to Capitol news conference.

“Although no one will be satisfied with every last word of this proposal, I urge all parties to see this to be very careful, comprehensive and common ground is a compromise,” said Torsella.

Subject-specific tests akan administration in nine through 12 as students complete the course work, which counted for about one-third at the end of the class. Pending federal approval, a score will also be used to measure the progress of schools in accordance with the No Child Left Behind law. Keystone Testing that will replace the Pennsylvania System School Assessment tests are given at this time in 11 classes.

The school district will not use the new graduation exam to determine competency. They can change the test for local purposes, but only with the approval of the state panel that consists of representatives from the school board, the state Board of Education and state Department of Education.

All districts must use student Keystones for assessing progress toward milestones meet federal Proficiency in math and reading, “said Department spokesman Mike Festival.
The Board is expected to consider the proposals on the next meeting, in mid-August, to determine the stage of development regulations that require months to review, Torsella said.
Board has been trying for more than a year to introduce new testing system to measure the performance of students more effectively. But the school board, teachers, trade unions and some lawmakers have argued along the road that will create burdensome requirements that mandate for local school districts.

Senate Education Committee Chairman Jeffrey E. Piccola praise Torsella for efforts to forge a consensus on “one of the most difficult problems of education I’ve witnessed.” Dauphin County Republican who said he will hold hearings on the proposals of the committee next week.
Piccola said he was particularly pleased that the test will have a value “means that the impact” on students’ class and the new system will replace the PSSA requirements that he considers duplicative and expensive.
Keystones are expected to save $ 40 million at the time they actually staged in seven years, because they can be taken in the final examination, will require less time from students, Torsella said.
Leaders Pennsylvania School Boards Association planned to brief members of the details of the plan last meeting in Gettysburg, spokesman David salter said, refused further comment.
In May, the Ministry of Education tempered by some lawmakers signed a contract with the Minnesota-based Data Recognition Corp. to develop new methods of testing before the tests that have been approved. Secretary Gerald Zahorchak temporarily shelved that idea last week with the hope to reach agreement.
Under Torsella’s proposal, the test in English literature, algebra I and biology will be introduced in the 2010-11 school year. From 2011-12 to 2015-16, the test in English composition, algebra II, geometry and U.S. history will be added. Testing for chemicals, citizenship and the history of the world will be completed in the 2016-17 list.
In the end, students will be required to pass six of 10 tests, two in English, mathematics and two in each one in science and social studies, Torsella said.

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